Johannes Brahms – Violin & Double Concertos – David Oistrakh, Mstislav Rostropovich, Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell (1969/2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Johannes Brahms – Violin & Double Concertos – David Oistrakh, Mstislav Rostropovich, Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell (1969/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:14:11 minutes | 1,45 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Front Cover | © EMI Classics
Recorded: 12, 13 & 16 May 1969 Severance Hall, Cleveland, Ohio

Brahms: Double Concerto – Violin Concerto is the stunning encounter that features prominent violinist David Oistrakh, cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, conductor George Szell and the renowned Cleveland Orchestra. The performers craft a compassionate reading that radiates with integrity and commitment. The sonics are well-balanced and warm.

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Beethoven, Brahms – Triple & Double Concertos – Geza Anda, Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Pierre Fournier, Janos Starker, Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Ferenc Fricsay (1961/1962/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Beethoven, Brahms – Triple & Double Concertos – Geza Anda, Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Pierre Fournier, Janos Starker, Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Ferenc Fricsay (1961/1962/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:11:23 minutes | 1,35 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | Digital Booklet | © Deutsche Grammophon
Recording date: #1-3 in June 1960, #4-6 in June 1961 ; Recording Location: Jesus Christ Church, Berlin, Germany

Fricsay conducts concertos by Beethoven and Brahms: Friendship is the connecting link between the two works here. Beethoven is thought to have written his Triple Concerto in 1803 – 04 for his favorite pupil, the Archduke Rudolph. Brahms composed his Double Concerto in 1887 as a peace offering, to heal a breach with his friend the violinist Joseph Joachim. It seems to have done the trick; and it was canny of Brahms, who conducted the first performance (Cologne, October 1887), to have the cellist of the Joachim Quartet, Robert Hausmann, sharing solo hon- ours – it would have been difficult for Brahms and Joachim to have a row with a third party present. I do not know how friendly the soloists on these two famous recordings were, but I recall what a strong “house style” manated from Deutsche Grammophon productions in the 1950s and early 1960s.

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